A People’s History of Southern Barbecue

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jul/04/barbecue-american-tradition-enslaved-africans-native-americans?CMP=share_btn_tw

Enjoy this piece I wrote, freshly published on The Guardian giving a short history of how barbecue is connected to American food and freedom through its enslaved African and Native American roots!

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About michaelwtwitty

I am a Judaics teacher and Culinary Historian focusing on the foodways of Africa, enslaved African Americans, African America and the African and Jewish diasporas.
This entry was posted in African American Food History, Cultural Politics, Diaspora Food Culture, Food and Slavery, Food People and Food Places, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Heirloom Gardening/Heritage Breeds and Wildcrafting, Pop Culture and Pop Food, The Cooking Gene and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to A People’s History of Southern Barbecue

  1. Reblogged this on bears, goats, and strawberries and commented:
    I do not want to hear your lies. Now, get your “African” ass out of my fucking nation. Try “sharecroppers” dumb ass.

    • Professor G. says:

      Thanks for being that guy (or gal) whose ignorant, hateful racism reminds everyone why we need to keep reading pieces like this one. And why Mr. Twitty and others need to keep writing them. P.S. “Your nation”? Hilarious.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Very interesting. I’ve been digging a fire pit in my backyard for a few days, and one of my intentions for it is to try out “barbacoa” technique, burying the meat (cow head, if I can get it) under wet leaves in the embers and ashes of a big fire. I understand this style of cooking to descend from what Arawak people did. This piece has given me much to think about as I dig.

  3. Karen L. Cox says:

    Reblogged this on Pop South and commented:
    From the talented pen of Michael Twitty.

  4. Nice! I enjoyed that reading, and the images are very nice! There’s nothing like educating yourself on our history! Great job!

  5. Pingback: Welcome to North Carolina: The Tar Heel State | Eating America

  6. elmediat says:

    Great article. My wife & I listened to your interview on CBC radio Q show with Shad. We were both very impressed with your presentation. 🙂

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