Monthly Archives: November 2013

To Know a Man From Paper: Remembering John Egerton (1935-2013)

To Know a Man From Paper: Remembering John Egerton (1935-2013) “…From those times hence, memory and habit have led succeeding multitudes to eat, drink and be merry; thinking, perhaps, that tomorrow the hard times might return, and they might die. … Continue reading

Posted in African American Food History, African Food Culture, Diaspora Food Culture, Events and Appearances, Food People and Food Places, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Pop Culture and Pop Food, Scholars, Elders and Wise Folk, The Cooking Gene | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

— Video: Michael Twitty on Culinary Injustice at…

The culinary historian Michael Twitty hasdedicated his career to celebrating the people whose culinary and agricultural contributions to America have been misappropriated throughout history. In August, Twitty spoke at MAD, imploring the audience to take an honest look at our gastronomic past, so that we might be able to bridge “pseudo-boundaries of race”, as well as restore “the emotional and ethical tone” of the food that we make. For Twitty, it all starts by acknowledging culinary injustice. At a time when the gastronomy of the American South is in the global limelight, for example, Twitty wants to remind us that there is culinary injustice in the fact that the slaves who made those food ways possible haven’t gotten enough credit. According to him, an even deeper injustice lies in the fact that, to this day, the descendants of those slaves can’t benefit from the seeds and traditions their ancestors brought to the States. “We brought over 20 different crops and animals from Africa,” he says, “but not one young black man in Charleston can lay claim to any of the fields that made the first millionaires in the country.” But Twitty doesn’t want to waste his time dishing out blame; he’s focused on reconciliation and progress. His goal is for the descendants of African slaves who positively transformed American culture (“From feijoada to gumbo, enslaved people always end up influencing those who enslave them”) to have sovereignty over their traditions. It is a way to a better future for all. Continue reading

Posted in African American Food History, African Food Culture, Diaspora Food Culture, Events and Appearances, Food and Slavery, Food People and Food Places, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Pop Culture and Pop Food, Scholars, Elders and Wise Folk, The Cooking Gene | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

History of Plenty: How the Thanksgiving Menu Evolved | LiveScience

http://m.livescience.com/41496-history-thanksgiving-menu-dishes.html I am delighted to share this mini culinary history of Thanksgiving from LiveScience.Com.  Very proud to be alongside my heroes culinary historians Andrew F. Smith, Sandra Oliver and Cynthia Bertlesen. 

Posted in African American Food History, African Food Culture, Diaspora Food Culture, Events and Appearances, Food and Slavery, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Pop Culture and Pop Food, Scholars, Elders and Wise Folk | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

From Colorlines: Recipes for a Multicultural Thanksgiving

http://m.colorlines.com/archives/2013/11/recipes_for_a_new_kind_of_thanksgiving.html I feel honored to join my friends Bryant Terry, Therese Nelson and others in this piece celebrating voices across the diverse American cultural landscape. Colorlines highlights the ways people of all colors and backgrounds define and enrich contemporary life.  … Continue reading

Posted in African American Food History, African Food Culture, Diaspora Food Culture, Events and Appearances, Food People and Food Places, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Heirloom Gardening/Heritage Breeds and Wildcrafting, Recipes, The Cooking Gene | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Culinary Historian Michael Twitty Brings “Kosher Soul” Feast to Swarthmore :: News & Events :: Swarthmore College

http://www.swarthmore.edu/news-and-events/culinary-historian-michael-twitty-brings-kosher-soul-feast-to-swarthmore.xml Thank you Dr. Dorsey and Jen! A write up on my visit to Swarthmore College.  I love this place.

Posted in African American Food History, African Food Culture, Diaspora Food Culture, Events and Appearances, Food and Slavery, Food People and Food Places, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Heirloom Gardening/Heritage Breeds and Wildcrafting, Jewish Stuff, Pop Culture and Pop Food, The Cooking Gene | Tagged , , | Leave a comment