Bringing Soul to Your Rosh Hashanah | The Weiser Kitchen

http://theweiserkitchen.com/bringing-soul-to-your-rosh-hashanah/

image

I am honored to share this guest blog post on The Weiser Kitchen!  It’s Rosh Hoshanah time! Here’s a great recipe for black eyed pea hummus.  Here’s an excerpt to whet your appetite:

” Black-eyed peas are a traditional Rosh Hashanah food. Lubiya or rubiya are included in the ancient Talmudic menu (including dates, gourds, beets, pomegranate, and the head of a sheep), that enumerates foods that are eaten for a good omen in the year to come. Unlike the Southern custom of eating black-eyed peas for luck and for “change” (all puns intended), the Jewish version uses the fertile multiplicity of this arid-environment plant to suggest the increasing of merit and mitzvoth in the year to come by punning the name of the food.

For me, an African-American Southerner who happens to also be a practicing Jew, the inclusion of black-eyed peas in the Rosh Hashanah “seder” of some Sephardic Jews was a welcome piece of home. Having converted in a Sephardic synagogue, my first High Holidays were less “apples and honey,” and more richly dressed tables full of mezze-style delicacies made from the Talmudic symbols of blessing, merit, protection, and good deeds. This was BEFORE you even got to the main festival meal of roasted meat; round, sweet, and slightly spiced challot; and date or sugar syrup—rather than honey. The table would finish off with sweet treats that included date and pomegranate syrup, orange water, rose water, and more warm and pungent spices—cakes, Tunisian crepes, and the like….”

Enjoy! L’SHANA TOVAH!

(We are STILL raising funds for the Cooking Gene research trips. Please consider donating what you can to our efforts as we push forward! Our PayPal button is ready for your generosity!)

image

About michaelwtwitty

I am a Judaics teacher and Culinary Historian focusing on the foodways of Africa, enslaved African Americans, African America and the African and Jewish diasporas.
This entry was posted in Diaspora Food Culture, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Jewish Stuff, Scholars, Elders and Wise Folk, The Cooking Gene and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Bringing Soul to Your Rosh Hashanah | The Weiser Kitchen

  1. asherblake says:

    I’d love to be at your holiday table! Thanks Michael!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s