Lots to do, more to come, enjoy!

Thanks to Ben Jankewicz and Queen Quet!

Please keep buying FIRSTHAND copies of THE COOKING GENE from HarperCollins, Amazon and Barnes and Noble. Sales of firsthand retail copies fund culinary trips to West Africa for people who can’t afford to go on their own dime. So far sales of the Cooking Gene have sent five people to West Africa in two years!! When you buy firsthand it helps authors build the kind of self sufficiency where we can help others. I appreciate you!

Chicken Bone: In place of the zer’oa or lamb shankbone; represents traditional sacrifices and migration from oppression to opportunity during the Great Migration.

Charoset: traditionally fruit, nuts and wine, this is molasses and pecans representing the sugarcane that fueled the beginnings of slavery and the duality of our culture in exile. Though we were in bondage we found things here to help us cope and overcome.
Sweet Potato: in place of the karpas or spring vegetable, traditionally parsley or a potato. Symbolic of using the American environment to perpetuate West and Central African tradition.
Egg: or beitzah, symbol of overcoming oppression, the Supreme Being, spring and cycles of nature.
Collards: Maror, or bitter herbs, to symbolize both the bitterness of enslavement but also how we survived it.
Hot pepper: In place of horseradish or chazeret, a sharper variety of maror meant to give a sense of the sting of the lash. Also, a spice central to West and Central African foodways, proverbially associated with speaking the truth.
Hoecake or Ashcake: made of corn, the closest analogue to matzah, the flatbread of slavery and yet the first food in freedom. This corn cake simply prepared was the hardtack of enslavement in colonial and Antebellum America. (kitniyot is forbidden for strict Ashkenazi Jews, Matzah may be substituted.)
Orange: modern symbol for including those who are often excluded from the forefront of religious communities or spiritual practice, from women in leadership to sexual minorities to the poor or differently abled. The orange symbolizes the flavor and sweetness inclusion brings us all.

5 comments on “African American Seder Plate

  1. steam1912

    Wow! That seder plate is both beautiful and thought-provoking.

    Like

  2. That looks wonderful and interesting. Unfortunately, even with glasses I can’t read the labels. If it’s not too much trouble, could you please also include them as text for those of us with visual impairment or just senior eyes? Thank you.

    Like

  3. That looks wonderful and interesting. Unfortunately, even with glasses I can’t read the labels. If it’s not too much trouble, could you please also include them as text for those of us with visual impairment or just senior eyes? Thank you.

    Like

  4. Pingback: San Antonio City Council Reconsiders Chick-fil-A Ban in Airport - Eater

  5. Great post . !! Interesting .
    I am glad to know about american sedar plate.
    It was great to know such an information.
    Thanks for posting !!

    Like

Leave a Reply to mgw Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: