Washington Post Food Section Profile

http://wpo.st/9LHC1

I just wanted to share with everyone this fantastic food section profile by Michaele Weissman on the growth of my work. It says a lot about how I got here and what keeps me here.  I want to thank Michaele, Joe Yonan, and Bonnie Benwick *THERE ARE RECIPES!!!!!* for all they put into this story and for letting my home town–Washington DC—know more about a local kid. I hope this piece inspires our young people. I don’t want to be the only one…I want new farmers, new cooks, new dreamers and learners!

Thank you. I’m just grateful. Very grateful. So are my Ancestors. Coming on the heels of my talk yesterday at #TED2016 I am absolutely in tears of joy. 

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About michaelwtwitty

I am a Judaics teacher and Culinary Historian focusing on the foodways of Africa, enslaved African Americans, African America and the African and Jewish diasporas.
This entry was posted in African American Food History, African Food Culture, Cultural Politics, Diaspora Food Culture, Events and Appearances, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Heirloom Gardening/Heritage Breeds and Wildcrafting, Pop Culture and Pop Food, Publications, Recipes, The Cooking Gene and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Washington Post Food Section Profile

  1. David Brown says:

    Bless you for your erudition and good taste.

  2. Anony Mole says:

    Michael, as a culinary historian you may have some insight on an idea I have had stewing in the back of my mind for some time. It’s an idea I think could be made into a network food show. I call it “Kings Kitchen.” What it is is a locale specific cooking adventure where the culinary techniques used by royalty’s chefs, throughout the ages, are explored. How did cooks prepare food for the world’s royalty? From England, to Central and South America, to Europe and the near and far East and to Africa — what historically was cooked and served to royalty. The demands on the chefs of royalty must have been tremendous. Such cooks would have had access to the latest ingredients and implements of their period. How did they accomplish the substantial task of feeding sometimes hundreds if not thousands of people. What did each kingdom cook?

    I think your experience and understanding would prove vital for such a show. I’ve tried to deliver this idea to various networks to zero success, no replies. I believe the topics and venues are nearly endless. If you have any interest, even in passing, I’ll be listening here. Thanks for your time, I look forward to reading more about your efforts, past and future. AM

  3. Tanya Jones says:

    So glad I found this article today to read about your amazing work and commitment. And so glad too that you are local! Wish I could find a schedule of where you’ll be speaking. — Tanya

  4. tio wally says:

    Great article. The “His Paula Deen takedown went viral. But this food scholar isn’t done yet.” headline, however, was most unfortunate. I thought your letter to Ms. Deen was most appropriate and your offer to cook a meal with her most generous. I thought it said everything anyone would need to know about your character. Thanks for being you. Keep on cookin’.

  5. Mila says:

    Hi,
    I got really excited reading the WaPo article because i see you do amazing work! Your research interests are similar to mine and your journey inspires me to keep studying and writing.

  6. I’m with Tanya! Please tell us when you’re next in D.C., it’d be awesome to hear you speak. I’m also a D.C. native and I loved reading about your journey… volunteering with the Smithsonian, being inspired locally… eyup, sounds familiar! And then you went sooo much further, following your passion. Amazing! Big congrats to you and your journey. I am definitely inspired to keep writing and dreaming alongside another empowered DC ‘local kid.’ I’m also OBSESSED with fried rice, so I can’t wait to try the African Soul Fried Rice recipe! Def. following this blog now too.

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