My Master Dry Brine Recipe for #Giving Tuesday

Hey Everyone!

I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you for the HUGE upswing in followers on social media and the increasing number of subscribers to Afroculinaria.  I would like to thank you by sharing my master dry brine recipe.  I would also like to make an appeal for Afroculinaria for #givingtuesday.

Your donations, no matter how small, really help us out a lot.  I’m not a corporation or a big player in the culinary scene, I’m an independent, itinerant, and I work hard to make ends meet.  SO many of you have been gracious and generous last year and beyond and I appreciate that.  I would like to convince others to join in donating 7$ (or less or more) to make sure we keep the gears going.  Your donations fund hiring young artists to do guest work and photography, they pay our petty bills and subscription costs, they help us have cash to make faxes and copies and do more research and when I get calls asking for help–your donations enable me to part with a little of my time and wisdom so that we can all rise up in knowledge.

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If you are on your mobile, go read this on the full site. On the full site in the lower right hand corner under the Archives is the yellow DONATE PayPal button. Please consider donating a little to keep us going.  7$ or less isn’t a lot.  But if a lot of people did that it would go a long way.  We’ve had hard times, but because of the generosity of so many of you–we’ve kept going and it’s meant the world not just to us–but the Ancestors whose stories we tell, promote, and share to the next generation.
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At a time with so much negativity is going around about matters of race, color, ethnicity, we should re-dedicate ourselves to supporting positive and enriching projects that help us reconcile with our past, honor our history and move forward confident in a renewed effort to be better, think better, live better, love better. For me, food is a critical part of that process, it brings people to the table and get’s folks thinking and tasting and I’m proud to say that this project brings people together and gets people thinking about the things that we hold in common.  It also helps people talk about things that are difficult or painful and issues that must be processed so that we can all grow and leave a better legacy.  Right now I am working on my first major book, THE COOKING GENE, and we can use all the help we can get.

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Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.  Gratitude and plenty and blessings to all this holiday season.

I love giving to my followers, please help me continue to do so.

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Here’s that recipe!  Enjoy!

Master Dry Brine

1 1/4 cup of kosher sea salt
1\2 cup of turbinado sugar
1 tablespoon of coarse ground black pepper
1 tablespoon of crushed juniper berries
1/2 tablespoon of apple pie spice
1 teaspoon of powdered ginger
1 tablespoon of granulated onion powder
1 tablespoon of powdered chicken broth
1 tablespoon of crushed, rubbed whole dried sage.
1/2 tablespoon of rosemary…dried or fresh, chopped fine or crushed.

Blend together, rub over and inside and under skin of your bird. If it’s a kosher bird, simply omit salt and the powdered broth. Set in refrigerator uncovered overnight or 12 hours. Give a quick, gentle rinse then follow your favorite roasting directions. Remember to allow the bird to rest 15-20 minutes after it cooks to truly be moist and absorb of all the flavor.  With a very very light hand–it also works well as a barbecue rub–season it–let it sit, rinse it, then cook it slow–works for everything!

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About michaelwtwitty

I am a Judaics teacher and Culinary Historian focusing on the foodways of Africa, enslaved African Americans, African America and the African and Jewish diasporas.
This entry was posted in Events and Appearances, Food People and Food Places, Recipes, The Cooking Gene and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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