I asked my colleague Chef Harold Caldwell to write about the process of butchering wild game in the colonial and antebellum periods.  This is a real treat full of detail about how our Ancestors survived. Our forefathers and foremothers made the original “soul food,” from the ingredients around them: squirrels, possums, raccoons, rabbits,  groundhog, eels, catfish, bass, trout, suckers, sturgeons, deer, rail, snipe, partridges, grouse and wild turkey. They made it all taste good because they had to. We know that but we aren’t too sure about how it was all done. Lucky for you Chef Harold and I are preserving this knowledge, and I’m pleased to share this excellent essay he has prepared with you.

image

The colonial and antebellum periods were a time in history where most people survived from the land. But land wasn’t the only source for food. Nourishment also came from oceans, bays, lakes, and rivers.

image

Some of the fish in the rivers and oceans were a bit unusual like the sturgeon or eel. Sturgeon looked like a fish from the prehistoric era. And eel looked like a snake that lived in the water. During the colonial and antebellum periods, people were accustomed to eating foodstuffs that some would consider today as “weird.”  One of the animals in particular was groundhog. But there were also meats that was more common than some of the food sources mentioned here. And that example is turkey. The wild game of turkey and groundhog were plentiful during the colonial and antebellum eras. Particularly amongst the enslaved. And the primary way for folks of the period to eat, was first through processing their own food. This article teaches how to prepare eel, ground hog, and wild turkey by way of butchering.

image

AMERICAN EEL: ANGUILLA ROSTRATA

image

First, get a sharp paring knife. Then cut just below the head and the gill all the way around. But make sure not to cut too deeply. Insert the knife between the the meat and the skin. Cut around the body enough to get your fingers under the skin. After cutting, nail the eel to a stump through the body, beneath the head.

image

image

Begin to pull the skin down very slowly so not to pull the meat from the bones. Pull the skin all the way down until it completely comes away from the body. The next step is to put the knife into the body below the head and gills. Cut on the underside of the eel. Do not cut deep. Gently cut down the the center all the way to the anus. Then open the cavity and let the guts fall out or pull them out of the body. Wash the insides out with water and the eel is ready to cook.

image

image

image

GROUNDHOG: MARMOTA MONAX

image

image

image

image

Ground hog is not too difficult to process. First, gather two sharp knives. One should be a paring knife. Second, cut beneath the head around the neck. Cut all the way through the meat to the bone. Then take a paring knife and cut just under the fur all the way around. Third, take the fingers and put them under the skin in order to free the meat from the skin. Put one hand one each side of the groundhog, and pull the fur gently down the body, until the fur reaches the feet. The fur should come off the feet. Fourth, separate the head from the body. This step might require an ax, hatchet, or cleaver. The next step is removing the innards.
Start with the knife just below the rib cage, and with a shallow incision, cut down to the anus. Lift ground hog up to let the innards fall out. There might be a situation where the hands will be utilized to free some of the guts from the cavity. After the body has been cleared, separate the feet from the body with a knife, hatchet, small ax, or cleaver. From this point, clean the meat with water. Then the groundhog can either be roasted whole or chopped into pieces (cut almost like you would chicken pieces) to be stewed, fried, or baked. 

WILD TURKEY: MELEAGRIS GALLOPAVO

image

image

image

image

image

The wild turkey is a bit easier to butcher but the buchering is a little different from the other game animals. It will be first necessary to acquire a pot big enough that most of the turkey can fit inside it. Once the pot is found, fill it half or more full of water, and heat until hot. DO NOT BOIL because the turkey is not ready to cook yet! Take the pot off the heat and put the turkey in the pot. Let the turkey sit for a few minutes. Then pull it out of the pot and grab the bottom of a feather quill, and pull the quill away from the body. Be careful because the turkey will be hot! If the feather comes loose, the turkey is ready to be plucked. Be aware that sometimes the feathers do not pull out so easily. The turkey will have to be soaked again but the water has to be hot in order for the feathers to come away from the body. Plucking the turkey could take a couple of soaks, so keep a fire going to reheat the water. After all the feathers have been pulled, the gutting can take place. First, turn the bird on its back and check for the anus. Then, on the breast side where the flabby skin is, make a cut from one side of the flabbyy area to the other. After the cut, make another cut from the middle of the horizontal incision down to get a hand inside the cavity. Insert the hand inside the body and pull the innards out. After the guts are cleaned out, rinse the inside and outside of the body with water. The turkey can now be cooked by roasting or baking with or without the head. Or the turkey can be processed into thighs, legs, breasts, and drumsticks. And don’t forget to cut the feet at the joint where the skinny and meaty portions of the leg meet. When y’all coming to dinner next?

image

Advertisements

4 comments on “Wild Game Butchering The Way Our Ancestors Did in Plantation Days

  1. Tony Canzoneri

    I have lived in Louisiana where we caught crayfish in the ditches with a piece of bacon on a string. and cooked them in the same water they came out of. Never cooked a ground hog, but everything else, snakes, turtles, you name it. The best thing ever is wild turkey but we usually skinned them, you lose the skin but you save a lot of time. Then fry the meat cut in strips and rolled in seasoned flour and corn meal. You guys are making me hungry. Thanks

    Like

  2. Thank you for sharing this. I love studying how our Ancestors ate. Understanding how people ate unlocks many answers about how people lived overall. More should butcher/fabricate their own meat. Such a luxury is really taken for granted in developed societies. If folks were exposed to what it really takes to slaughter, clean, and butcher for meat, I think we’d appreciate meat more and eat less of it. Thanks again.

    Like

  3. This was pretty awesome. Wasn’t really sure how the groundhog would turn out but it seemed really simple. I also wonder if the innards would have been utilized as well? Harold had them in such a neat package that I was curious if they wouldn’t get fried up and put alongside the meat.

    Like

  4. Reblogged this on ebullientepicurean and commented:
    This is AMAZING!!!! This is true narrative sharing through cooking! This man is doing what I wish I could. Absolutely amazing!!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: