Tune in Tonight: Many Rivers to Cross With Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr.

With Dr. Henry Louis Gates wrapping up taping of part of Many Rivers to Cross

With Dr. Henry Louis Gates wrapping up taping of part of Many Rivers to Cross

I am delighted to announce tlhat I will be appearing on the first episode of The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross with Henry Louis Gates, Jr. on Tuesday, October 22, 2013.  Set your DVRs now 🙂   There will be repeats so catch those too!

IMG_7082
Hoppin’ John from the Lowcountry and Black  Eyed Pea (Cala au Congri) and Rice Cakes (Cala) from the Chesapeake and Lower Mississippi Valley
and to find your local listing for the program:  http://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/schedule/
IMG_2362
The first episode is called THE BLACK ATLANTIC 1500-1800 and deals with the earliest experiences of the African American people from our origins in West and Central Africa through the early colonial period into the 18th century.  One of the aspects of this shift in culture and identity is through food.  I was so pleased that one of the producers reached out to me and of course 6 hours is going to be about 5 minutes or less of airtime –but I don’t care this is a major blessing and I am so happy to share it with all of you who have watched me work to get here.  I thank all of you for subscribing to Afroculinaria and being the impetus for so many good things! Until then enjoy some behind the scenes and close up shots of the historic  foods I prepared for Dr. Gates.
P.S. I will be live tweeting during the show, follow me on Twitter @koshersoul  Enjoy the pictures!
IMG_7098
IMG_7076
Green glaze collard greens, kush, peanuts, sweet potatoes, black eyed pea cakes and hot peppers…. part of the story of early African American cooking and becoming African Americans….
Showing Dr. Gates heirloom seeds and how they are small repositories of our history.  Here I am showing Orinoco tobacco---thousands of seeds to the teaspoon!

Showing Dr. Gates heirloom seeds and how they are small repositories of our history. Here I am showing Orinoco tobacco—thousands of seeds to the teaspoon!

The Real Meal:  Salt Fish, Salt Meat and Corn meal or Rice is most of what enslaved people ate...from day to day...

The Real Meal: Salt Fish, salt meat and corn meal, hominy or rice is most of what enslaved people ate…from day to day…

Gardens provided the vegetables, flavorings, medicinal herbs, and fruits that added necessary variety and healing ingredients to the diet and lifestyle of enslaved people and free people of color.

Gardens provided the vegetables, flavorings, medicinal herbs, and fruits that added necessary variety and healing ingredients to the diet and lifestyle of enslaved people and free people of color.

 

 

Advertisements

About michaelwtwitty

I am a Judaics teacher and Culinary Historian focusing on the foodways of Africa, enslaved African Americans, African America and the African and Jewish diasporas.
This entry was posted in African American Food History, African Food Culture, Diaspora Food Culture, Events and Appearances, Food and Slavery, Food People and Food Places, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Heirloom Gardening/Heritage Breeds and Wildcrafting, Scholars, Elders and Wise Folk, The Cooking Gene and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Tune in Tonight: Many Rivers to Cross With Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr.

  1. Norm Johnson says:

    Congratulations!

  2. Yay, Michael! Can’t wait for the episode! I know you will be brilliant as usual!! Best, Kate

  3. Lynn Peniston says:

    I listened to Michel Martin’s NPR program this afternoon and I’m excited to hear more of your discussions on the foods enslaved Africans brought to this country and more of what was created on these shores. Thanks!

  4. rabbiadar says:

    I am so glad that your work is getting this exposure! May many people tune in and learn, and may many more opportunities come of it!

  5. Hi! I have recently discovered your website, I am enjoying reading it very much, it has great info! I hope we can begin to exchange some ideas! Thank you.

  6. Ann says:

    Watching it now and loving it! So good. The information is invaluable about how recipes and food traveled and flowed. Love it. Must go back to watch.

  7. Kim Murch Huffman says:

    For some reason our Central New York PBS stations were not broadcasting properly :/. I will watch this one way or the other! I imagine it was great!

  8. Pingback: You Got Roots?! Culinary Historian Michael Twitty’s Coming to School Us! | AAGSAR: YOU GOT ROOTS?!

  9. cheflincoln says:

    Reblogged this on Mise en Plaos and commented:
    I saw this program yesterday and it was very well done, informative and engaging. Check it out if you get a chance!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s