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American slaves’ Christmas was a respite from bondage – and a reinforcement of it | Michael W Twitty | Opinion | The Guardian

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/dec/25/american-slaves-christmas-was-a-respite-from-bondage-and-a-reinforcement-of-it

I wish everyone a happy holiday. It’s interesting that for such a straight, matter of fact piece, the first comment was already negative and had to be removed by the Administrator. I never thought that in 2015, even writing about African American history would get immediate hate mail. Yes Virginia, even the enslaved had a “Christmas,” and it had a lot of different meanings for enslaved people. It is important to not forget what that life was like for them and how that we world impacted us today. I proudly and defiantly write their story because it must must must be told. Merry Christmas! Please share this information at your holiday table, social justice is an enduring holiday message.

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The original re-creation of John Canoe at Somerset Place Plantation in Creswell, NC.

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10 comments on “American slaves’ Christmas was a respite from bondage – and a reinforcement of it | Michael W Twitty | Opinion | The Guardian

  1. Alisa Boyd

    As usual, a beautiful and educational piece. I have learned much from you this past year. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. chilling, soul-stirring, hackle raising, beautifully written. Thank you for your work and so looking forward to your book!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Erika Bongort

    Your piece pointed out a very simple and important concept which is most often overlooked… Make the most of what you have. Thank you for sharing.

    Like

  4. Loved this. Thank you for sharing.

    Like

  5. Thank you for writing this, Michael. I was not familiar with John Canoe, but reading your piece ignited memories of growing up in Detroit in the 1960s and 1970s. My Alabama Grandmother would send a box to us in Detroit box every Christmas season which contained the following: pecans from the pecan tree in her yard, homemade fruit cake, pieces of peppermint candy crushed from a “larger-than-life” candy cane, and shiny-skinned oranges. One of my Uncles always brought his homemade hog’s head cheese to our Christmas Eve family gathering. Even as a child I detected the role these “humble” food traditions played in our family’s expressions of kinship.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Read this article in the guardian the other day and I’ll be looking forward o more.

    Like

  7. This is a great blog, I’m so glad I found it! It’s so difficult to share stories like this with some people.

    http://www.pofoundetry.com

    Like

  8. excellent piece.
    I am sure you have heard of the trend to get rid of the comments section – it rarely adds anything positive. How can someone rail against a telling of history, yet when a flag/monument comes down they lament about how history is being lost. No answer needed obviously

    Like

  9. katmcdaniel

    Thank you for sharing this. I am so embarrassed by people and their ignorance. Keep up your work!

    Like

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