Author Archives: michaelwtwitty

About michaelwtwitty

I am a Judaics teacher and Culinary Historian focusing on the foodways of Africa, enslaved African Americans, African America and the African and Jewish diasporas.

A People’s History of Southern Barbecue

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jul/04/barbecue-american-tradition-enslaved-africans-native-americans?CMP=share_btn_tw Enjoy this piece I wrote, freshly published on The Guardian giving a short history of how barbecue is connected to American food and freedom through its enslaved African and Native American roots!

Posted in African American Food History, Cultural Politics, Diaspora Food Culture, Food and Slavery, Food People and Food Places, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Heirloom Gardening/Heritage Breeds and Wildcrafting, Pop Culture and Pop Food, The Cooking Gene | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

My Heritage, Your Hate: Take on the Confederate Battle Flag Controversy

This is my response to the Confederate battle flag controversy.  The heritage of the Confederate era doesn’t just belong to white people, and for those of us who have a part in that history, it is impossible not to weigh … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural Politics, Pop Culture and Pop Food, Scholars, Elders and Wise Folk, The Cooking Gene | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Cutting to the White Meat: The Real Issue With Rachel Dolezal

By now you’ve probably seen this picture: That’s Rachel Dolezal, NAACP activist, Africana studies professor, and according to her parents a white woman pretending to be a woman of color. Move over Iggy, all your problems just got solved, #fixitJesus … Continue reading

Posted in Pop Culture and Pop Food, The Cooking Gene | Tagged , , , , | 15 Comments

In Honor of National Soul Food Month: The Roots of Soul

It’s National Soul Food Month. Yes there is such a thing! I thought I might take you on a tour of one of the sources of soul, the early Chesapeake. I’ve written frequently about the Chesapeake being the first “Creole … Continue reading

Posted in African American Food History, African Food Culture, Diaspora Food Culture, Events and Appearances, Food and Slavery, Food People and Food Places, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Heirloom Gardening/Heritage Breeds and Wildcrafting, Scholars, Elders and Wise Folk, The Cooking Gene | Tagged , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Poplar Forest cooking event focuses on food, culture of enslaved community – News – Lynchburg, Virginia Area – The News & Advance

http://m.newsadvance.com/news/local/poplar-forest-cooking-event-focuses-on-food-culture-of-enslaved/article_b3b00f04-0740-11e5-be9f-8b8847507fd5.html?mode=jqm

Posted in African American Food History, African Food Culture, Diaspora Food Culture, Events and Appearances, Food and Slavery, Food People and Food Places, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Heirloom Gardening/Heritage Breeds and Wildcrafting, Publications, Scholars, Elders and Wise Folk, The Cooking Gene | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Who held the first Memorial Day celebration? | Michael W Twitty | Comment is free | The Guardian

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/may/22/who-held-the-first-memorial-day-celebration Enjoy this piece I wrote on the African American roots of Memorial Day. Blessings and honor on all our nation’s fallen, with a special thanks to soldiers of color and LGBT identity who despite slavery, reservations, interment camps and … Continue reading

Posted in African American Food History, Publications, Scholars, Elders and Wise Folk, The Cooking Gene | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Invisible Chefs | First We Feast

http://firstwefeast.com/eat/the-invisible-chefs/?utm_campaign=fwf+socialflow+05+2015&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social Please enjoy this piece I wrote for First We Feast on the lack of media attention to chefs of color.

Posted in African American Food History, African Food Culture, Diaspora Food Culture, Events and Appearances, Food Philosophy at Afroculinaria, Pop Culture and Pop Food, Publications, The Cooking Gene | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments