The Southern Discomfort Tour REALLY needs YOU

We have four days left to raise some 3,000 plus for our campaign.  Over 600 people viewed this blog yesterday.  If only 180 had made a contribution to our Campaign of 18$ or more, the Campaign would have been an overnight success…We need you—Now.  Please contribute $18 or more today:  www.indiegogo.com/The-Cooking-Gene-Project-The-Southern-Discomfort-Tour

We are going from Maryland to Louisiana in search of America’s culinary roots.  We need you more than ever.  We want to soar into this project and be amply prepared for all of the blessings and opportunieis to help others we encounter.  Please don’t hesistate or wait to the last minute–we need to know in the next few days that this will be possible.  Thank you!

Michael and the Team :)

And now for a recipe:

Sassafras Tea

In the markets ofSenegalandGambiatoday, various herbs and roots are sold to make herbal teas which are widely enjoyed.  InAmerica, the spring tonic “cure all” known to all of my grandparents—who came fromVirginia, South Carolinaand Alabama—was sassafras tea.  Because doctors were few and far between, and because enslaved communities were largely responsible for their own health and upkeep, sassafras was used as a tonic to keep a family in good health as much as possible.  Although it is alleged that sassafras roots have carcinogenic chemicals in them, it’s interesting that our forefathers and foremothers lived long healthy lives, drinking sassafras tea liberally. Persimmon tree leaves, full of vitamin C made another healthy herb tea, along with spicebush berries and wild herbs that grew on the ground.

1 quart of boiling water

¾ cup cleaned, dried, chopped sassafras roots

Boil the sassafras with the water and allow it to steep.  When the water turns dark red, the tea is ready.  Sweeten with honey to taste.

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About michaelwtwitty

I am a Judaics teacher and Culinary Historian focusing on the foodways of Africa, enslaved African Americans, African America and the African and Jewish diasporas.
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